thechanelmuse:

Voices in Our Blood by Jon Meacham

Sister Outsider by Audre Lorde

Pedagogy of the Oppressed by Paulo Freire

Losing My Cool by Thomas Chatterton Williams

Black Picket Fences by Mary Pattillo-McCoy

The Hip Hop Generation by Bakari Kitwana

The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin

The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Alex Haley

The History of White People by Nell Irvin Painter

Policing The Crisis by Stuart Hall

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration In the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

White Like Me by Tim Wise

How The Irish Became White by Noel Ignatiev

Other People’s Children by Lisa Delpit

Punished: Policing the Lives of Black and Latino Boys by Victor M. Rios

(via bapgeek2geekbap)

didi-is-spiffy said: White people whitewashed Jesus and Mary and many religious figures, but tell them that the devil is white and all of a sudden it's a problem

tashabilities:

chocolatecakesandthickmilkshakes:

whitepeoplesaidwhat:

-Elijah

well sir there you have it. class dismissed. 

Facts on facts on facts

"If anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to them the other cheek also"

Matt 5:39

This specifically refers to a hand striking the side of a person’s face, tells quite a different story when placed in it’s proper historical context. In Jesus’s time, striking someone of a lower class ( a servant) with the back of the hand was used to assert authority and dominance. If the persecuted person “turned the other cheek,” the discipliner was faced with a dilemma. The left hand was used for unclean purposes, so a back-hand strike on the opposite cheek would not be performed. Another alternative would be a slap with the open hand as a challenge or to punch the person, but this was seen as a statement of equality. Thus, by turning the other cheek the persecuted was in effect putting an end to the behavior or if the slapping continued the person would lawfully be deemed equal and have to be released as a servant/slave.   

(via thefullnessofthefaith)

THAT makes a lot more sense, now, thank you. 

(via guardianrock)

I can attest to the original poster’s comments. A few years back I took an intensive seminar on faith-based progressive activism, and we spent an entire unit discussing how many of Jesus’ instructions and stories were performative protests designed to shed light on and ridicule the oppressions of that time period as a way to emphasize the absurdity of the social hierarchy and give people the will and motivation to make changes for a more free and equal society.

For example, the next verse (Matthew 5:40) states “And if anyone wants to sue you and take your shirt, hand over your coat as well.” In that time period, men traditionally wore a shirt and a coat-like garment as their daily wear. To sue someone for their shirt was to put them in their place - suing was generally only performed to take care of outstanding debts, and to be sued for one’s shirt meant that the person was so destitute the only valuable thing they could repay with was their own clothing. However, many cultures at that time (including Hebrew peoples) had prohibitions bordering on taboo against public nudity, so for a sued man to surrender both his shirt and his coat was to turn the system on its head and symbolically state, in a very public forum, that “I have no money with which to repay this person, but they are so insistent on taking advantage of my poverty that I am leaving this hearing buck-ass naked. His greed is the cause of a shameful public spectacle.”

All of a sudden an action of power (suing someone for their shirt) becomes a powerful symbol of subversion and mockery, as the suing patron either accepts the coat (and therefore full responsibility as the cause of the other man’s shameful display) or desperately chases the protester around trying to return his clothes to him, making a fool of himself in front of his peers and the entire gathered community.

Additionally, the next verse (Matthew 5:41; “If anyone forces you to go one mile, go with them two miles.”) was a big middle finger to the Romans who had taken over Judea and were not seen as legitimate authority by the majority of the population there. Roman law stated that a centurion on the march could require a Jew (and possibly other civilians as well, although I don’t remember explicitly) to carry his pack at any time and for any reason for one mile along the road (and because of the importance of the Roman highway system in maintaining rule over the expansive empire, the roads tended to be very well ordered and marked), however hecould not require any service beyond the next mile marker. For a Jewish civilian to carry a centurion’s pack for an entire second mile was a way to subvert the authority of the occupying forces. If the civilian wouldn’t give the pack back at the end of the first mile, the centurion would either have to forcibly take it back or report the civilian to his commanding officer (both of which would result in discipline being taken against the soldier for breaking Roman law) or wait until the civilian volunteered to return the pack, giving the Judean native implicit power over the occupying Roman and completely subverting the power structure of the Empire. Can you imagine how demoralizing that must have been for the highly ordered Roman armies that patrolled the region?

Jesus was a pacifist, but his teachings were in no way passive. There’s a reason he was practically considered a terrorist by the reigning powers, and it wasn’t because he healed the sick and fed the hungry.

(via central-avenue)

IT’S BACK

(via dynastylnoire)

(via rosa-parks-was-arrested-4-thot)

janetmock:

Heroes — a Collaboration with artist Julio Salgado

I was honored when undocuqueer artivist Julio Salgado emailed me about wanting to collaborate on a project about my biggest influences. He drew portraits of me embracing my heroes, and I provided words about their significance in my life. 

These images moved me to tears, and I am grateful to Julio for creating them with me. 

AUDRE LORDE

Audre Lorde was the first black lesbian feminist writer I was exposed to in college, and she blew my world up. Her body of work, from her poetry to her prose, pushed me to transform silence and define myself.

MAYA ANGELOU

I first read “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings” in the 10th grade, and Maya Angelou pushed me to make freedom my lifelong quest. She wrote about being a black girl who was touched without permission and protection, and it emboldened me to share my most uncomfortable truths.

SYLVIA RIVERA

Our elders are our greatest untapped resource, and Sylvia is my blueprint. Without the work and legacies of my foremothers (including Marsha P. Johnson and Miss Major Griffin-Gracy!) I could not and would not be able to thrive as a young trans woman writer of color.

ZORA NEALE HURSTON

Without Zora Neale Hurston’s “Their Eyes Were Watching God” there would be no “Redefining Realness.” Zora was a revolutionary woman and writer. She centered a black woman’s quest for identity and love, making Janie Crawford my No. 1 heroine. This book is a lifemap!

JAMES BALDWIN

I adore no man more than James Baldwin. I’ve devoured all his writings and find myself seeking his guidance by watching footage of his interviews. There is no better orator and thinker than Baldwin. He slays, all day, every day.

What a fantastic project!

"Capitalism has altered how Americans interact with the divine. For many of us, faith isn’t the evidence of things unseen, it’s the message printed on our doormats so people walking into our homes know what to expect. Under America’s watch, God has been reduced to a commodity, a combination of ideas and products that we export, import, mass-produce, and display seasonally on our mantels. In today’s evangelical culture, God sticks, clings, smells, burns, downloads, lights, ticks, and brightens dark corners."

Matthew Paul Turner (via azspot)

(via awesome-everyday)

letterstomycountry:

Mr. Rogers makes us all look terrible.
WHYY Media

letterstomycountry:

Mr. Rogers makes us all look terrible.

WHYY Media

(via msenjoli)

"Stop acting so small. You are the universe in ecstatic motion."

— Rumi  (via ttfkagb)

(Source: turbogirl, via bapgeek2geekbap)

I have a hard time believing that a God that is nothing but love would purposely create a creature inferior to another. It is impossible. I am equal to everything and anything that is around me — therefore, I must deal with it with so much respect and I must get that respect back. And I’m not going to explain the obvious and I’m not here to win I’m here to exist. For you to try to change me to make me more like yourself . .sit on this (shows middle finger) it’s just not gonna happen. I’m not defined by sex; I’m not defined by race; I’m not defined by a nationality — I’m Zoe. And I could have been a boy, I could have been a dog I just.. but I’m Zoe. I’m my mothers daughter I’m my fathers dughter and that is my . . how do you say it? . . That’s my biggest achievement in life. I know who I am. I love who I am. I like what I do, and I like how I do it. I like my mistakes and I like the pace at which I learn from my mistakes. I don’t want to be anybody else but me, and by knowing this, I want to continue figuring out who the f*ck I am.”

(Source: marvellra, via scififreak35)

sblaufuss:

I nearly choked.

sblaufuss:

I nearly choked.

(Source: spiralingsidewayz, via ipomoeaj)

"We’ve been fed this falsehood about what subversion is in American evangelicalism. We worship a Christ in our own image – a European, cisgender, heterosexual Christ who is more interested in making sure you don’t have to provide your employees with birth control than with whether or not you just made someone homeless by firing them because they’re gay."

Today, I went off about subversion and what that really looks like. (via diannaeanderson)

The next in Dianna’s series on queer theology.

(via isopod)

(via isopod)